TAC has the capability of validating a user’s device.  When device validation is turned on, a user’s device is bound to that user’s account.  The device must be approved for use by an administrator before that user can get access.  Once approved, the user must have both their valid credentials and the approved hardware device before any access will be allowed.  This provides a much stronger way to control access to information and to protect the organization.

It’s also easy to revoke the privilege of a particular hardware device.  Say, for example, a user loses their mobile phone, but still has their tablet and laptop.  Just the mobile phone can be blocked.  It can also be wiped (full or partial) to protect the information on the device.  If the device is found again, it can just as easily be unwiped and the user can begin using it again right away.

One of the biggest issues currently facing organizations is phishing attacks.

When using Device Validation you also get other substantial benefits, one being Phishing protection. For many organization using just username and password, a phishing attack that compromises a user’s credentials is a very serious breach.  Once inside, the hackers will use the breached account to pivot and attack more people and assets within the organization.  Protection from this kind of attack is crucial (and all too commonly missing).

TAC provides protection from phishing attacks by combining multiple factors of authentication which a hacker would not be able to obtain.

One of the biggest issues currently facing organizations is phishing attacks.

When using Device Validation you also get other substantial benefits, one being Phishing protection. For many organization using just username and password, a phishing attack that compromises a user’s credentials is a very serious breach.  Once inside, the hackers will use the breached account to pivot and attack more people and assets within the organization.  Protection from this kind of attack is crucial (and all too commonly missing). TAC provides protection from phishing attacks by combining multiple factors of authentication which a hacker would not be able to obtain.

As an example, with device validation turned on, the user’s account is bound to a physical hardware device. Even if a hacker gets the username and password, they would not have the same hardware device, so any attempt to make a connection would be denied.

As an example, with device validation turned on, the user’s account is bound to a physical hardware device. Even if a hacker gets the username and password, they would not have the same hardware device, so any attempt to make a connection would be denied

81% of hacking-related breaches leveraged either stolen and/or weak passwords.

Use of stolen credentials and backdoor/C2 were the most prominent hacking varieties (represented in over half of the breaches), with brute force attacks reporting just under a third. Many of these attacks involved actors using valid partner credentials and backdoors, while a third of them represented desktop sharing as the hacking vector.Use of stolen credentials and backdoor/C2 were the most prominent hacking varieties (represented in over half of the breaches), with brute force attacks reporting just under a third. Many of these attacks involved actors using valid partner credentials and backdoors, while a third of them represented desktop sharing as the hacking vector.

7.3% of users across multiple data contributors were successfully phished—whether via a link or an opened attachment. That begged the question, “How many users fell victim more than once over the course of a year?” The answer is, in a typical company (with 30 or more employees), about 15% of all unique users who fell victim once, also took the bait a second time. 3% of all unique users clicked more than twice, and finally, less than 1% clicked more than three times.

81% of hacking-related breaches leveraged either stolen and/or weak passwords

Use of stolen credentials and backdoor/C2 were the most prominent hacking varieties (represented in over half of the breaches), with brute force attacks reporting just under a third. Many of these attacks involved actors using valid partner credentials and backdoors, while a third of them represented desktop sharing as the hacking vector.

7.3% of users across multiple data contributors were successfully phished—whether via a link or an opened attachment. That begged the question, “How many users fell victim more than once over the course of a year?” The answer is, in a typical company (with 30 or more employees), about 15% of all unique users who fell victim once, also took the bait a second time. 3% of all unique users clicked more than twice, and finally, less than 1% clicked more than three times.

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